Chocolate Mousse Recipe

29th February 2024

Chocolate Mousse with a Coffee Twist

This delicious chocolate pudding is known for its unique bubbly and foamy texture. Pair it with a dash of coffee and get a decadent but light dessert. Yummy! Whoever invented this perfect post-dinner treat deserves a gold medal, especially when it’s something coffee can be incorporated into. If you are looking for the perfect light pudding after a heavy meal or a quick pudding which can whipped up and kept in the fridge- this is the recipe for you.

 

Chocolate Mousse

Is Chocolate Mousse Italian?

It is not! Mousse means ‘foam’ in French, so this is a big hint about who should take the credit. Chocolate was introduced to France in 1615 after the marriage of Louis XIII to the Spanish princess Anne. Spain had been sipping on chocolate since the Spanish colonisation of America in 1529, adopting chocolate from its original Mexican roots. This started France’s love affair with chocolate, with Marie-Antoinette having a personal chocolate maker in court, creating new recipes with orange blossom and almonds.

The production of chocolate didn’t boom until the 19th century with the development of big corporations like Cadbury’s and Menier. However, historically, Chocolate has been around for 4000 years.

The first cacao plants were grown in Mexico, with the cacao seeds being harvested and developed by The Omlec society. They were amongst the first Mesoamerican groups, lasting from 1600 BCE to 350 BC, who primarily used chocolate for drinking. This beverage was used as medicine or in spiritual rituals. Today, there is evidence that dark chocolate contains antioxidants, which can help reduce blood pressure and the risk of clots and increase blood circulation. It looks like the Omlec were on to something!

Who invented Chocolate Mousse?

This is an interesting question to answer; there’s a lot of information out there! While some sources date back to France in the 17th century, others also credit post-impressionist painter Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, who was also a keen chef. We even discovered some ‘mayonnaise de Chocolat’ recipes (yuck?)

Traditionally, chocolate mousse falls into the sector of traditional sweet puddings alongside custard. This is one of the reasons why some recipes are referencing it as mayonnaise de Chocolat, as you are whisking egg with another mixture, just like traditional mayo.

Today, there are two versions of Chocolate Mousse: French and American. The French method is the original way of making a traditional mousse, using eggs to create a light texture. The American version, however, opts for whipped cream instead. You will typically find a 50/50 split on which recipe you will find; we are going traditional with our espresso chocolate mousse, using eggs rather than cream.

What makes Chocolate Mousse grainy?

One of the issues that may occur when making a mousse is that it may have a grainy texture. This happens if the melted chocolate starts to solidify before you add your egg whites. The chocolate may have hardened into tiny grains, which causes this texture. If this happens, don’t worry; it’s not a lost cause. It will still taste great!

Another thing to watch out for is not to overheat your chocolate. Ensure your bain marie is set up correctly, and the base of the bowl isn’t touching the water. Burnt chocolate will result in a bitter flavour and a guaranteed graininess! The way to tell if you have overheated your chocolate is if it’s become a thick paste; if this happens, it’s best to start again.

How to ensure you get that bubbly texture

One of the most important aspects of a mousse is ensuring you get that airy, foamy texture. We have some tips to ensure you get a perfect mousse every time.

  1. Be patient when folding in your egg whites! Slow and steady wins the race with this one. You want to ensure you don’t furiously mix the mixture, as you will beat out all the air. This will cause the mousse to become too smooth, and you’ll lose the desired texture completely.
  2. Use a metal spoon! You want to avoid wooden spoons like the plague when folding. A metal spoon is superior to cleanly slicing through that mixture rather than beating it like a wooden spoon.

Now, who’s ready for the recipe? Let’s go!

Ingredients:

200g dark chocolate (75% cocoa solids)

120 ml coffee

3 large eggs (separated)

40g caster sugar

150g raspberries (optional)

 

Method

  1. Brew your coffee and let it cool until warm but not boiling. Pour into the bowl with the chocolate.
  2. Break up the chocolate into chunks and place in a heatproof bowl which fits over a simmering saucepan of water (creating a bain marie)
  3. Let the chocolate melt slowly on medium heat, stirring until smooth and glossy (roughly 6 minutes).
  4. Remove from heat once all incorporated.
  5. Let the mixture cool for 2-3 minutes and stir in the egg yolks. Put aside.
  6. In a fresh bowl, whisk the egg whites until soft peaks are formed.
  7. Start to whisk in the sugar, 1/3 at a time. Keep whisking until glossy.
  8. Take a tablespoon of the egg whites (using a metal spoon) and fold it into the chocolate.
  9. Add the rest of the egg whites and slowly fold together.
  10. Divide the mousse mixture into six ramekin dishes (or coffee cups) and cover with clingfilm.
  11. Chill for at least 2 hours or overnight.
  12. To finish, individually top with raspberries or fresh cream.

Looking for the perfect coffee to use? Shop below!

 

All Coffees

Join the troop